All Articles by Lindsey Barton Straus, JD

Access To Athletic Trainers Doubles In 20 Years, But 30% of U.S. High Schools Still Provide No AT Services

Three out of ten U.S. high schools still do not currently have any access to ATs, but the number of high schools with AT access has doubled in the last twenty years to 70 percent, providing coverage to 86% of all high school athletes.

College Athletes Start Playing Their Sport Early, But Specialize Late, Research Shows

Early sports specialization has been increasingly viewed as increasing an athlete's chances of achieving elite status, but has raised significant concerns, both as to whether it actually accomplishes that objective, and whether it carries with it an increased risk for sports-related injuries. A quartet of research papers explore various aspects of the issue.

Cheerleading Injuries in High School Sports: Less Common, But More Severe

High school cheerleaders don't get injured as often as athletes in other sports, but, when they do, the injuries are more serious, finds a first-of-its-kind study published in the journal Pediatrics.

Aerobic Exercise May Help Lessen Symptoms In Children and Teens With Post-Concussion Syndrome

Aerobic therapy (AT) may lessen the symptoms experienced by children and adolescents suffering from post-concussion syndrome and allow them to return to baseline, report researchers in a paper presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in October 2015 in Washington, D.C.

High School Athletic Directors Face Numerous Obstacles In Hiring Athletic Trainers, Study Finds

Athletic directors at the thirty percent of U.S. high schools lacking access to athletic trainers identify lack of AD hiring authority, budgetary constraints and non-budget factors, including rural location, misconceptions about an AT's role, and community interference, as barriers to hiring athletic trainers, a new study published in the Journal of Athletic Training reveals.

Banning Soccer Heading In Youth Soccer: Will It Make The Sport Safer?

The November 2015 announcement by a group of US youth soccer groups of a recommendation that players age 11 and younger be barred from heading the ball and that headers be limited in practice for those from age 12 and 13, has generated controversy, with experts lining up on both sides of the debate.

Pediatrics Group Declines To Endorse Outright Ban On Tackle Football

The American Academy of Pediatrics today endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced, and likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18,

Is Flag Football A Safer Alternative To Tackle? Too Soon To Tell, Says Study

Flag football has often been suggested as a safer alternative to tackle football, but is it safer? Too soon to tell, say researchers from the University of Iowa.

Study Shows Rule Limiting Tackling During High School Football Practices Significantly Reduces Concussion Rates

Limiting the amount of full-contact tackling during high school football practices can have a big impact on reducing the number of concussions among players, new research finds.

ACL Injuries Increase Among School-Aged Children and Adolescents

New research confirms what doctors working with young athletes already suspected: the number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears among youths, particularly high school students, has risen during the past 20 years.