All Articles by Lindsey Barton Straus, JD

Overuse Injuries and Burnout in Youth Sports: What We Know And What We Don't

While much is known about the causes and risk factors associated with overuse injuries and burnout, more research is needed, concludes a new position statement on overuse injuries and burnout.

Is It Time To Put The "Ice" in RICE On Ice?

A new book challenges the decades-old use of ice in the treatment of sports injuries, with some now claiming it has no therapeutic value in sports medicine. On the other side are those who still swear by icing a sports injury to reduce acute-injury bleeding, relieve post-injury soreness, and for relieving pain. So, is it time to remove the "I" from the first-aid acronym RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation)? We checked with MomsTEAM's expert physical therapist to find out.

Concussion Education: Athletes and Parents Still Not Getting Nearly Enough

There is good news and bad news in a first-of-its-kind study about implementation of the nation's first youth sports concussion safety legislation. The good news is that nearly all football and soccer coaches at public high schools in Washington State have completed the required concussion education, are generally knowledgeable about concussions, and are comfortable in deciding when to refer players for additional evaluation for a suspected concussion. The bad news is that concussion education of athletes and parents was much less extensive.

Concussions Lead To Microscopic Structural Changes In The Brain, Three New Studies Say

Concussions result in microscopic white matter and inflammatory changes to the brain, say three new studies published in the Journal of Neurosurgery. The studies add to a growing body of research suggesting that concussion can no longer be thought of as a transient injury resulting in a temporary disruption of brain function, but results in structural and electrophysiological changes which persist long after the injury occurs.

Study's Finding That Newer Helmet Reduced Concussion Risk Validates STAR Helmet Rating System, Says Duma

A 2014 study has found that the risk of sustaining a concussion for players wearing a helmet with a newer design was 46.1% lower than for players wearing a helmet with a 20-year-old design. To find out more about the study and its implications, MomsTEAM's Senior Health and Safety Editor Lindsay Barton conducted an interview via email with one of the lead authors, Stefan Duma, PhD, head of the Virginia Tech - Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineering. Here is what she reported.

Standardizing Preparticipation Physical Exams Is Goal Of New NATA Position Statement

A standardized process for conducting the preparticipation physical examination is needed to ensure a safe playing environment for athletes and to help identify those conditions that may predispose an athlete to injury or sudden death, says the National Athletic Trainers' Association in a new position statement.

Microstructural Changes Detected In Hockey Players' Brains May Be Due To Concussive or Subconcussive Trauma

Using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), researchers have identified microstructural changes in the brains of male and female college-level ice hockey players that could be due to concussive or subconcussive trauma.

Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Misuse Five Times Higher For Gay and Bisexual Boys

A new study from The Fenway Institute, a Boston health center for the LGBT community, shows that gay and bisexual boys use anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) at rates much higher than their straight counterparts. One of the reasons is an obsessive desire to look better, which is behind the use by more and more teenagers, gay and straight.

Rehabilitation After ACL Reconstruction: Clinical Guidelines Found Safe And Effective

A review of studies evaluating various therapies utilized in rehabilitation from anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery provides additional support for guidelines issued by a multi-center group of 20 clinicians in 2001 (dubbed the MOON guidelines, and establishes that most have a sound basis in science.

Exercise Program Helps Post-Concussion Syndrome By Restoring Normal Cerebral Blood Flow

Controlled aerobic exercise rehabilitation may help restore normal cerebral blood flow regulation in patients with post-concussion syndrome patients, relieving the symptoms they experience during exercise and prolonged cognitive working memory tasks such as fatigue and difficulty concentrating, finds a new study.