All Articles by Lindsey Barton Straus, JD

Concussion Has Long Term Effect On Cognitive Function and Visual Processing, Studies Find

Sport-related concussion sustained in early life can have long-term implications for brain health and cognitive and sensory function, find two new studies. The findings add to a growing body of research on long-term deficits stemming from sport-related concussion, and suggest that concussive injuries can disrupt fundamental elements of higher-order neurocognition by chronically impairing attention, working memory, inhibition, and interference control, as well as lower-level sensory and perceptual processing.

Cyberbullying: Which 3 Social Networks Are the Worst?

Social media sites are one of the leading places that pre-teens and teens experience bullying, whether they are being bullied, bullying someone or witnessing it. What is staggering is that 90% of those who witnessed bullying on their social media sites have ignored the behavior. Which are the worst three social media sites for bullying?

Concussion Rate For Female Middle-School-Aged Soccer Players 4 Times Higher Than For High School Athletes

Female middle school soccer players sustained concussions at a rate higher than their high school and college counterparts, most continued to play despite experiencing symptoms, and less than half sought medical attention, a first-of-its-kind study finds.

Full Cognitive Activity After Concussion Delays Recovery, Study Finds

Teens who continue to engage in full cognitive activity after sport-related concussion take from 2 to 5 times longer to recover than those who limit such activity, a new study has found. The findings provide important support for current concussion guidelines recommending cognitive rest during the initial stages of recovery from concussion.

History Of Concussion Linked To Increased Risk of Depression In Teens

A history of concussion is associated with more than a 3-fold increased risk of a current diagnosis of depression, even after controlling for age, sex, parental mental health, and socioeconomic status, finds a new study, which recommends that clinicians caring for youth with concussion be aware of this association and screen youth for symptoms of depression.

Perception of Recovery After Concussion Influenced By "Good Old Days" Bias

The ability of teens, and, in the case of younger athletes, their parents, to accurately recall the severity of symptoms experienced before after a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) injury iis subject to a "good old days" bias and declines dramatically over time, says a new study, which suggests that using symptom ratings of pre-injury functioning obtained as soon as possible after injury might result in a 5 to 7-fold improvement in a clinician's identification of patients who have clinically recovered from concussion.

Doctors' Decision To Clear Athletes To Return To Play After Injury: Wide Variability In Factors Considered

The lack of a systematic approach to making return-to-play (RTP) decision-making has resulted in a high degree of variability among sports medicine doctors in weighing different factors, with some factors considered important by athletes, teams, coaches, and parents viewed as unimportant by doctors in the RTP decision, finds a new study.

Risk Factors For Sports Concussion: Only Concussion History, Game Action Certain To Increase Risk, Study Finds

Previous concussions and match play are all but certain to increase the risk of concussions, but the jury is still out on whether other factors, such as sex, playing position, playing level, style of play, environment and injury mechanism, also increase concussion risk, finds a first-of-its-kind, evidence-based systematic review of the scientific literature.

Child-Specific Concussion Management Tools Needed, Study Says

Child-specific tools need to be developed and used for the diagnosis, recovery-assessment and management of their concussions, focusing less on return to play as the goal as return to learn, a new study recommends.

Heading in Soccer Doesn't Lead To Long-Term Cognitive Decline, Study Finds

Preliminary data from a study of retired professional English soccer players has found that, once their playing careers end, the chronic low-level head trauma they sustained from repetitive heading does not put them at greater risk of long-term cognitive decline than the general population.