All Articles by Lindsey Barton Straus, JD

ACL Injury Rate Significantly Higher For Female High School Athletes

A new research paper finds the overall rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among high school athletes is significantly higher among females, who are especially likely to experience ACL tears while playing basketball, soccer and lacrosse.

Coaches and Parents: If Concussion Suspected, What To Do Next Is Simple

If a parent, coach, or game official suspects that a player has suffered a concussion playing sports, the player should be removed immediately from play, banned from returning that day, and be sent to be checked out right away by a medical professional. No sideline test, smartphone app or screening tool can help decide whether to allow the athlete to continue playing.

Drinking On A Schedule Not The Same As Encouraging Young Athletes To Over-Drink, Experts Say

A recent article in the New York Times expresses one expert's concern that coaches and parents who press young athletes to drink fluids before, during, and after a practice, whether the athletes feel thirsty or not, may be putting young athletes at risk of drinking too much water, which can result in a dangerous, life-threatening condition called hyponatremia. We wondered what other experts felt about the article's advice, so we asked three of our go-to hydration experts for their thoughts.

Repetitive Head Impacts Damage The Brain: A 'No Brainer,' Purdue Researchers Find

Research by scientists at Purdue goes a long way to eliminating any remaining doubt that repetitive head impacts, such as sustained by players in American football, result in brain abnormalities and impaired neurocognitive functioning during a football season, and that those effects persist long after the season.

Purdue Study First To Find Subtle Cognitive Deficits In High School Football Players From Repetitive Head Impacts

A 2010 study by researchers at Purdue University was the first to report that football players who displayed no clinically-observable signs of concussion, nevertheless showed measurable impairment of neurocognitive function (primarily visual working memory) on neurocognitive tests, as well as altered activation in neurophysiologic function on sophisticated brain imaging tests (fMRI).

Saying Most Kids Aren't Dehydrated Not The Same As Saying Dehydration Not A Concern For Youth Athletes

It may be a myth that people need to drink 8 glasses of water a day, and that most kids are dehydrated, but, says a sports hydration expert, that isn't the same as saying dehydration isn't a concern for kids playing sports.

Preparticipation Sports Physicals: Not Foolproof

While athletes should undergo regular preparticipation sports physical, parents need to understand that they are limited in their ability to detect all serious or life-threatening medical conditions, and, as a result, a "normal" evaluation does not imply absence of risk.

Study Confirms Adverse Effect of Concussion On Academic Learning And Performance of Children and Teens

Student-athletes who experience lingering concussion symptoms and their parents are more concerned about the adverse effect of concussion on learning and school performance, report more school-related problems, and more classes posing difficulty than students who recover more quickly, finds a new study.

Multiple Concussions More Prevalent In Athletes With ADHD and Learning Disabilities

High school and college athletes with a history of developmental disorders such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) are 2 to 3 times more likely to self-report having experienced multiple concussions than those without such history, a first-of-its-kind study finds.

Does Body Shaving Increase MRSA Risk?

Players who reported body shaving are 6.1 time more likely to develop MRSA infections. Shaving genitals or the groin was associated with a higher infection risk than shaving other body sites.