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Parent-Coach Relationship

Eight Tips for a Successful Youth Sports Season

The most successful sports seasons are the ones that begin with a preseason meeting for parents and players. A preseason meeting sets a positive tone for the season by opening the lines of communication early so that everyone, parents, athletes, and coaches, understands and agrees on what they expect from one another.

All-Star Team Selection: A Better, Fairer Way?

To say that politics and favoritism are often involved in the selection of all-star teams in youth sports would be an understatement, but making the selection process fairer is easier said than done.

Talking To A Coach: Taking the Stress Out

If the world were a perfect place, talking to a youth sports coach would be as natural and stress free as talking to your child's teacher. Unfortunately, there is not much that worries and confuses some parents more. Here's advice on how to take the stress out of the experience.

Approaching Youth Sports Coaches When Parents Share Common Concerns

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., says that, in most circumstances, a parent's best course of action if she has a concern with her child's coach is to empower the young athlete to speak to the coach herself. When a number of parents on a team find that they share a common concern, however, it may be time to request that the coach hold a team meeting for players and parents. It is important that parents inform the coach in advance of the meeting of the general area of concern and that they emphasize that the goal is to find a positive solution that is best for all the children.

Approaching Youth Sports Coaches When Parents Share Common Concerns

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., says that, in most circumstances, a parent's best course of action if she has a concern with her child's coach is to empower the young athlete to speak to the coach herself. When a number of parents on a team find that they share a common concern, however, it may be time to request that the coach hold a team meeting for players and parents. It is important that paretns inform the coach in advance of the meeting of the general area of concern and that they emphasize that the goal is to find a positive solution that is best for all the children.

Talking To Youth Sports Coaches When Parents Share Common Concerns

Child psychologist Shari Kuchenbecker, Ph.D., says that when a number of parents on a team find that they share a common concern it may be time to request that the coach hold a team meeting for players and parents.

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