Prevention

Penn State Sex Abuse Scandal: What Happens When Media Spotlight Fades?

The alleged sexual abuse of boys by a longtime coach at Penn State* has focused media attention once again on the issue.  For the parents of the alleged victims, of course, their worst nightmares have come true. But what could have been done to prevent it? And is the culture of male sports itself at least partially to blame?

The sad fact, as noted in an article by Michael Hartill, a lecturer in the Department of Sport and Physical Activity at Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, Lancashire, England who has studied sexual abuse of boys in sports extensively, is that "the largely unregulated world of children's sport has typically been slow to address the issue of sexual abuse of youth athletes." 

The alleged sexual abuse of boys by a longtime coach at Penn State has focused media attention once again on the issue.  For the parents of the alleged victims, of course, one their worst nightmares has come true. But what could have been done to prevent it? And is the culture of male sports itself at least partially to blame?

Preventing Sexual Abuse At Summer Camp: Five Tips for Parents

Summer camp is an ideal place for abusers. While no camp is immune from the possibility of sexual abuse, there are five important steps parents can take to prevent their child from becoming a victim says abuse expert, Dr. Jackie Humans.

Sexual Abuse in Sport: The Problem No One Wants To Talk About

On July 12, UNICEF's Innocenti Research Center in Florence, Italy released an important report on violence against children in sport in industrialized countries, including the United States.

The report found a troubling lack of awareness of and education on child protection issues among youth sports coaches, parents, and other stakeholders. To combat the problem it recommends improvements in data collection and knowledge generation about violence to children in sport, development of structures and systems for eliminating and preventing such violence (including promotion of ethical guidelines and codes of conduct), and education, awareness-raising and training.

Myths About Sexual Abuse In Sports

In a 2010 speech, a world-reknowned expert lists fourteen of the most common myths about sexual abuse in sports, and issues a call to action.

 

Preventing Sexual Abuse by Coaches: Advice for Parents

Reliable statistics on the incidence of sexual abuse by coaches in youth sports are hard to come by, but the how and why of sexual abuse by coaches are well-known.  A leading sports and child psychiatrist offers prevention tips for parents and athletes.

Little League International's Efforts Fail to Protect Children From Sex Offenders, Convicted Criminals and Injury

I am the mom of a nine year old Little Leaguer and I am worried about the safety of my child, and all the other innocent children who step on fields across the country, who are at risk of having their lives destroyed by sex offenders and convicted criminals who prey on them as youth sports coaches.

Parents Can Protect Their Children Against Sexual Abuse in Sports

By far the most important step a parent can take to protect her child from a sexual predator is to make sure the coach is never alone with a child. Demand that a two-adult rule be instituted. A two-adult rule not only protects the player but the coach: if he is never alone with a child then inappropriate behavior cannot be alleged. Private or closed practices are a red flag. If the coach wants to exclude you from practice, ask why.

Youth Sports: Abuse Takes Many Forms

Abuse in youth sports takes four basic forms: physical, emotional, sexual and neglect. Unfortunately, all forms of abuse are common and the damage from the most common form of abuse (emotional abuse) is no less real than the damage resulting from other forms of abuse.

Prevent Sexual Abuse by Coaches with Two-Adult Rule, Background Checks, says de Lench

Allegations that former House Speaker Dennis J. Hastert sexually abused the of eight boys over a 15-year period highlights the continued need for parents to be proactive in protecting their children from becoming victims of a sexual predator while participating in sports.

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