All Articles by Brooke de Lench

Concussion Education and Safety Meetings Should Be Mandatory

Because one of the keys to keeping athletes safe when it comes to concussion is education, a concussion education and safety meeting should be held for parents and athletes should be held before every season. Ideally, the meeting should include presentations by medical doctors, former athletes, and parents of concussed current or former athletes.

Concussion Checklist for Parents

MomsTeam Founder and long-time concussion safety advocate, Brooke de Lench, provides a concussion safety checklist for parents to know their child's sports program is taking concussions seriously.

Concussions: Parents Are Critical Participants in Recognition, Treatment, Recovery

Parents are critical participants in the recognition and treatment of, and recovery from, a concussion, not only in the first 24 to 48 hours but during every step in the process towards an eventual return to the play.

Sports Concussion Myths and Misconceptions

Sports concussion myths are still common, despite increased media focus and education in recent years. Here are the facts.

Conservative Management of Youth Concussions, More Education Needed, de Lench Says

In her keynote address to the 2nd Annual Sports Concussion Summit in Marina del Ray, California MomsTeam.com founder Brooke de Lench offered suggestions on how parents, coaches, officials, administrators, athletic trainers, clinician, current or former professional athlete, and sports safety equipment manufacturer, could work together as a team to protect the nation's children against the serious, life-altering consequences of concussions.

Concussions in Sports: Does Gender Matter?

Girls have higher concussion rates in sports like soccer and basketball than boys, but whether they experience greater levels of acute, postconcussive neurocognitive impairment remains unclear, even after extensive research.

Female Athlete Triad

In 1992, the American College of Sports Medicine first recognized that girls and women in sports were particularly susceptible to three interrelated conditions – disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, and osteoporosis – that have come to be known as the "female athlete triad."