Hyponatremia

Replace Electrolytes Lost During Sports

Sweating results in the loss of both electrolytes (particularly sodium) and water. Orange juice, moderate salting of food in the diet, and sports drinks help replace electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, and chloride lost during sports. 

NATA Revised Exertional Heat Illness Position Statement

NATA has released an executive summary of a new position statement on exertional heat illnesses revising its 2002 statement to reflect new research and expert consensus.

Over-Hydration (Hyponatremia): Another Point of View

In a recent article for MomsTEAM, sports nutrition expert Nancy Clark discussed the subject of over-hydration (hyponatremia). MomsTEAM's sports hydration expert weighs in with some additional thoughts.

Tips for Exercising Safely in the Heat

With the end of winter finally here, temperatures will continue to rise over the next few months. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has teamed up with the Korey Stringer Institute (KSI) to prepare a list of important tips that people of all ages can follow to enjoy physical activity and exercise and also reduce the risk of exertional heat illness that may occur from activity in the spring and summer.

Performance Nutrition for Football: Replacing Electrolytes Prevents Muscle Cramps

The loss of electrolytes such as sodium and potassium through sweat can lead to muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting and even death.  Electrolytes are minerals (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chloride) which send messages to nerves and muscles throughout the body,  and are involved with muscle contraction and relaxation during exercise, so that an imbalance can impact the actual contraction of the muscle itself.

Tips for Exercising Safely in the Heat

With summer temperatures soaring, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has prepared a list of important tips that people of all ages can follow to enjoy physical activity and exercise and also reduce the risk of exertional heat illness that may occur from activity in the heat of summer. This is especially timely in July and August when young athletes are participating in summer and pre-season sports programs and back-to-school games are just around the corner.

Prevent Hyponatremia During Exercise Lasting Four Hours Or Longer

Hyponatremia occurs where sodium levels in the blood become dangerously low due to excessive water consumption.  Blood sodium levels that drop too low can lead to seizures, coma, and even death.  To prevent hyponatremia usually occurs in endurance and ultra-endurance events follow these guidelines.

Hyponatremia: Dangerous Drop in Sodium Level From Excessive Water Consumption

Hyponatremia is a relatively rare form of heat illness in which sodium levels in the blood become dangerously low due to excessive water consumption.  It usually occurs in endurance and ultra-endurance events lasting four hours or longer. While children do not ordinarily participate in these kinds of activities, hyponatremia is so dangerous that it something sports parents should know about.
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